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Real Good Fish | Fish Species | | Fish Species | Bringing you the freshest sustainably caught LOCAL seafood!
“If we eat from our own shores, we're much more inclined to protect them, the water quality, and our marine environment.”
- Paul Greenberg, American Catch
Dungeness Crab / Metacarcinus magister

Dungeness crabs molt, or shed their shells, between May and August and mating occurs immediately after the female has molted and before the new exoskeleton hardens. A chivalrous crustacean, the male Dungeness crab embraces the female for several days before mating. The commerical season runs...

Dungeness crabs molt, or shed their shells, between May and August and mating occurs immediately after the female has molted and before the new exoskeleton hardens. A chivalrous crustacean, the male Dungeness crab embraces the female for several days before mating. The commerical season runs from late fall through the early summer, pausing in the warmest months to avoid this sensitive spawning period.


Cooking Tips:
 Crab cakes, cioppino, and crab ravioli are all perfect with Dungeness crab. We deliver crab pre-cooked so it is ready to eat right when you get it.

Catch Method: Traps aka "pots"

Sustainability: Dungeness crab populations on the West Coast are stable and the fishery is extremely well-managed. Fishing seasons are scheduled to avoid crabs’ primary molting season, and size regulations ensure that female and undersized crabs are not retained and allowed to mate. Also, crab traps have very low amounts of bycatch.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Good Alternative

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: N/A

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Ridgeback Prawn / Sicyonia ingentis

The ridgeback prawn gets its name from its hard shell. It is the only species of rock shrimp along the U.S. west coast. They are broadcast spawners, sending their eggs into the open ocean, as opposed to other shrimp that carry their fertilized eggs with them until they hatch. Females produce...

The ridgeback prawn gets its name from its hard shell. It is the only species of rock shrimp along the U.S. west coast. They are broadcast spawners, sending their eggs into the open ocean, as opposed to other shrimp that carry their fertilized eggs with them until they hatch. Females produce about 86,000 eggs on average during the spawning season of June through October. Having a high fertility rate is important for a species that is enjoyed by lingcod, halibut, sharks, rays, octopus, and humans alike.

Cooking Tips: Whatever you do, be sure to eat them fresh or remove the head and freeze right away, since they are highly perishable. They are fantastic for raw preparations, or quickly cooked for a pasta dish.

Catch Method: Bottom Trawl

Sustainability: This fishery was overfished in the 1990's and we can understand why Seafood Watch would be cautious, but we feel that our ridgeback shrimp fishing partners are operating sustainably. Fishermen are reporting very little bycatch this season so far, and they are using gear modifications and fishing in sandy bottom areas to avoid harming the seafloor. The fishery is closed from June-September to protect spawning females, and in general management is strict because of the history in this fishery. Only about 11 permit holders actually fished for ridgebacks last year.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Avoid

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: N/A

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Rock Crab / Romaleon antennarium

Also known as the Pacific or California rock crab, this nocturnal crab has eleven teeth to either side of the eyestalks. It is found at depths of no more than 300 feet, but usually around 150 feet deep. Their habitat of choice is low rocky intertidal areas, where they bury under rocks or in kelp...

Also known as the Pacific or California rock crab, this nocturnal crab has eleven teeth to either side of the eyestalks. It is found at depths of no more than 300 feet, but usually around 150 feet deep. Their habitat of choice is low rocky intertidal areas, where they bury under rocks or in kelp beds. They are great scavengers, relying primarily on small bits and pieces from small fish and hermit crabs, which they capture by gradually chipping away at the edges of their shells until the hermit crab has nowhere else to go.

Culinary Tips: Rock crab don't have much meat in their bodies, but they have large claws that are typically pre-cooked and sold on their own as a perfect appetizer or a beautiful addition to a seafood tower.

Catch Method: Traps

Sustainability: Rock crab are a less targeted species off the Central Coast due to the prevalence of larger Dungeness crab, so fishing pressure is generally lower. Traps use to catch rock crab do not disturb habitat and have very low bycatch. 

- MBA Seafood Watch rating: Good Alternative

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: N/A

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Spot Prawn/Pandalus platyceros

Spot prawns are a large species of shrimp that sell for high prices and typically land in southern California. They are sold live whenever possible, or quickly frozen, since they have an enzyme in their shell which will deteriorate the flesh quickly after they die. The fishery originated by...

Spot prawns are a large species of shrimp that sell for high prices and typically land in southern California. They are sold live whenever possible, or quickly frozen, since they have an enzyme in their shell which will deteriorate the flesh quickly after they die. The fishery originated by accident in the early 1930's in Monterey when they were caught incidentally in octopus traps.

The season runs from November - February typically, but in practice it only lasts for a few weeks due to conservative catch limits.

Culinary Tips: Most chefs will not cook spot prawns at all, and will serve them raw referred to as "amaebi" on sushi menus. If you do cook them, keep the preparation simple and cook them quickly to keep their buttery sweet flavor.

Catch Method: Traps

Sustainability: Traps produce little bycatch, and the areas with sensitive marine habitat or whale migrations that might get entangled in traps are highly regulated. This is a relatively small fishery in terms of volume, so overfishing is not likely to be happening.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Good Alternative

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: N/A

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