Please wait (up to a minute) while we process your order.

Thank you.

Submit
(or pick-up)


Add To Cart
(or enter your zipcode)

Try Another Zip Code?
(or pick-up)

Add To Cart
close
Join Real Good Fish
Join Now
Forgot Password
You will receive an email from us shortly. Click the link to set a new password.
submit
Reset Password
Success! Your password has been reset
submit
User Settings
submit
Email Required
Before you continue browsing the site we need your email
submit
Real Good Fish | Fish Species | | Fish Species | Bringing you the freshest sustainably caught LOCAL seafood!
“If we eat from our own shores, we're much more inclined to protect them, the water quality, and our marine environment.”
- Paul Greenberg, American Catch
King Salmon / Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

Also known as Chinook salmon, the King Salmon is the largest salmon species in the Pacific. They are popular in the kitchen of course, but they are also prized by sport fish from California to Alaska.

Like all salmon species king salmon are anadromous, meaning they are born in fresh water,...

Also known as Chinook salmon, the King Salmon is the largest salmon species in the Pacific. They are popular in the kitchen of course, but they are also prized by sport fish from California to Alaska.

Like all salmon species king salmon are anadromous, meaning they are born in fresh water, migrate to salt water to live most of their lives, then they return to their natal stream to spawn and die. Each spring this annual king salmon return begins in California, running through to mid-summer. The commerical king salmon season begins and ends with this migration. 

Culinary Tips: King salmon is the richest most decadent species of Pacific salmon and can be cooked any way you can imagine. It is fanstatic prepared on a cedar plank on the grill, roasted with seasonal vegetables in the oven, or even smoked or cured.

Catch Method: Troll

Sustainability: Some salmon populations along the California coast are endangered or threatened, so the chinook salmon that is allowed to be caught is highly monitored and done so as sustainably as possible. Troll gear is extremely selective and produces very little bycatch and no harm to the marine habitat.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Good Alternative

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: 2 out of 4 for some rivers, N/A for other rivers

Read More
Rockfish / Genus Sebastes and Sebastolobus

There are more than seventy rockfish species native to the Pacific coast of the U.S. and we offer as many varities as we can find. Chilipepper Rockfish, Blackgill Rockfish, Boccaccio Rockfish, Splitnose Rockfish, Vermillion Rockfish, Gopher Rockfish are a few of our favorites. "Rock Cod" or...

There are more than seventy rockfish species native to the Pacific coast of the U.S. and we offer as many varities as we can find. Chilipepper Rockfish, Blackgill Rockfish, Boccaccio Rockfish, Splitnose Rockfish, Vermillion Rockfish, Gopher Rockfish are a few of our favorites. "Rock Cod" or "Pacific Snapper" are other local nicknames for rockfish species. The southern half of the California coast has the most rockfish diversity anywhere, with at least 56 different species known. 

Rockfish earned their name because they are bottom-dwelling species that prefer rocky areas. Fish species in this genus have some of the longest lifespans of any fish on earth, and some have been recorded to live up to 205 years. These long life-spans made it difficult for some species to absorb industrial fishing pressures that peaked in the 1980's and '90's, and many rockfish species became overfished. Today though, Pacific groundfish populations like rockfish have largely recovered due to strict management and responsible fishermen.

Culinary Tips: All rockfish species have a mild flavor, cook to a medium firmness, and flake nicely. Larger fillets can be dredged in flour and pan fried, while smaller rockfish are delicous cooked whole. Rockfish is also sometimes served raw in a ceviche.

Catch Method: Bottom and midwater trawls, rod and reel, and traps

Sustainability: Rockfish fisheries are highly regulated under both state and federal laws. In federal waters, the rockfish trawl fishery is part of the Catch Shares program, with 100% observer coverage. Hook and line caught rockfish has very low bycatch rates. A growing number of Pacific rockfish fisheries on the west coast are becoming Marine Stewardship Council certified for sustainability.

- MBA Seafood Watch rating: Best Choice and Good Alternative

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: 2.5-4 out of 4

Read More
Sanddabs / Citharichthys sordidus

Native to the northern Pacific, this flatfish has the ability to change its color and pattern to match its surroundings, making it virtually invisible to predators. Pacific Sand Dabs are a local delicacy and have in and out of vogue over the years in California restaurants. They feed on...

Native to the northern Pacific, this flatfish has the ability to change its color and pattern to match its surroundings, making it virtually invisible to predators. Pacific Sand Dabs are a local delicacy and have in and out of vogue over the years in California restaurants. They feed on shellfish, squid and octopus, making them one of the sweetest and tastiest fish available.

Culinary Tips: We recommend a quick cooking method and light flavor pairings. They are best when fried on the bone (aka "Pan Ready") or as fillets. 

Catch Method: Bottom Trawl, Trap or Hook and Line

Sustainability: Consistent landings indicate that populations are stable. Hook and line and trap fishing has minimal bycatch with the ability to throw back juvenile fish. Bottom trawling for sanddabs is highly regulated under the catch shares program, which has reduced fishing pressure.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Best Choice

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: 2.5 out of 4 

Read More
White Seabass / Atractoscion nobilis

The white seabass, also known as white weakfish or king croaker, is not a seabass at all. It is a member of the croaker family, and it is the largest croaker in the Pacific Ocean. This species can exceed 20 pounds (only in California), with the largest recorded specimen reaching over 5 feet long...

The white seabass, also known as white weakfish or king croaker, is not a seabass at all. It is a member of the croaker family, and it is the largest croaker in the Pacific Ocean. This species can exceed 20 pounds (only in California), with the largest recorded specimen reaching over 5 feet long and 93.1 pounds. They feed primarily on anchovies, sardines, and squid. Some adults have been found to have eaten nothing but Pacific mackerel, a strong tasting fish often used in sushi.

This is an infamous fish in the recreational spear-fishing community in southern California. They are a rare find and tend to prefer deeper, murkier waters. Spearing a white seabass is considered quite an accomplishment.

Culinary Tips: White seabass is a versatile fish that is great over the grill with simple seasoning. It can become a bit dry if overcooked though, so marinades are perfect for this species.

Catch Method: Trolling, rod and reel, or gillnet

Sustainability: The white sea bass population has recovered from heavier fishing pressure in the past. Today the population along the central coast of California and in Monterey Bay is believed to be healthy. When caught with hook and line, bycatch is very low.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Good Alternative

- NOAA FishWatch Rating: Not rated

Read More