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Real Good Fish | Fish Species | | Fish Species | Bringing you the freshest sustainably caught LOCAL seafood!
“If we eat from our own shores, we're much more inclined to protect them, the water quality, and our marine environment.”
- Paul Greenberg, American Catch
California Halibut / Paralichthys californicus

This bottom-dwelling flatfish is native to the waters off central and southern California, can weigh up to 50 pounds, and is loved by sport fishermen since it can occasionally be caught from shore or by kayak in shallow waters. It is actually more closely related to a flounder rather than the...

This bottom-dwelling flatfish is native to the waters off central and southern California, can weigh up to 50 pounds, and is loved by sport fishermen since it can occasionally be caught from shore or by kayak in shallow waters. It is actually more closely related to a flounder rather than the Pacific halibut which resides in waters farther north along the west coast. California halibut is caught year-round, but it is most commonly landed in the summer and early fall.

Culinary Tips: There is no wrong way to prepare California halibut. It is delicate enough steam or shallow poach, but is also one of the only flatfish robust enough to handle the grill too. It can also be prepared raw for any recipe calling for fluke, flounder or the Japanese translation - "hirame".

Catch Method: Trolling Lines and Bottom Trawling

Sustainability: Landings of California halibut have stayed consistent in recent years which indicates that populations are not being depleted. The catch methods do not generate significant amounts of bycatch, and the management by the California Department of Fish and Game is effective and keeps fishermen accountable.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Best Choice or Good Alternative

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: N/A

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King Salmon / Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

Also known as Chinook salmon, the King Salmon is the largest salmon species in the Pacific. They are popular in the kitchen of course, but they are also prized by sport fish from California to Alaska.

Like all salmon species king salmon are anadromous, meaning they are born in fresh water,...

Also known as Chinook salmon, the King Salmon is the largest salmon species in the Pacific. They are popular in the kitchen of course, but they are also prized by sport fish from California to Alaska.

Like all salmon species king salmon are anadromous, meaning they are born in fresh water, migrate to salt water to live most of their lives, then they return to their natal stream to spawn and die. Each spring this annual king salmon return begins in California, running through to mid-summer. The commerical king salmon season begins and ends with this migration. 

Culinary Tips: King salmon is the richest most decadent species of Pacific salmon and can be cooked any way you can imagine. It is fanstatic prepared on a cedar plank on the grill, roasted with seasonal vegetables in the oven, or even smoked or cured.

Catch Method: Troll

Sustainability: Some salmon populations along the California coast are endangered or threatened, so the chinook salmon that is allowed to be caught is highly monitored and done so as sustainably as possible. Troll gear is extremely selective and produces very little bycatch and no harm to the marine habitat.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Good Alternative

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: 2 out of 4 for some rivers, N/A for other rivers

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Lingcod / Ophiodon elongatus

Prior to cooking, the lingcod’s flesh can sometimes appear bright blue or green, making it a distinctive species at your local fish monger. And after cooking, they'll turn white. Lingcod is nicknamed buckethead, and is native to the North American Pacific coast but is neither ling nor cod. Its...

Prior to cooking, the lingcod’s flesh can sometimes appear bright blue or green, making it a distinctive species at your local fish monger. And after cooking, they'll turn white. Lingcod is nicknamed buckethead, and is native to the North American Pacific coast but is neither ling nor cod. Its name originated because it somewhat resembles those fish. Lingcod also support a popular recreational fishery.

Culinary Tips: Lingcod is a lean, white fleshed fish that has a mild flavor and cooks to a medium-firm texture with a nice flake. It can be substituted for any recipe calling for rockfish or halibut.

Catch Method: Hook and line and bottom trawl

Sustainability: Biomass off the US West Coast is high. They have very high reproduction rates. Lingcod are caught with gear that have little impact on habitats and very low accidental catch. Management is strong, with seasonal closures during spawning season. 

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Best Choice and Good Alternative 

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: 4 out of 4

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Pacific Bonito / Sarda chiliensis

Pacific Bonito aka Skipjack Tuna are a relatively small tuna from the same family as albacore (Scombridae). They have beautiful dark blue coloring on top that fades to silver on their underbelly, and are easily identified by dark slanted bands along their sides. Fast growing, Pacific bonito...

Pacific Bonito aka Skipjack Tuna are a relatively small tuna from the same family as albacore (Scombridae). They have beautiful dark blue coloring on top that fades to silver on their underbelly, and are easily identified by dark slanted bands along their sides. Fast growing, Pacific bonito often weigh 3 pounds within a year of hatching. Their rapid growth and extremely efficient body shape give them speed and strength, which makes them popular among fishermen. 

Culinary Tips: Bonito can be plugged in for any tuna recipe you find, so it is great poached, seared, grilled or served raw. It holds up well to heavy seasoning and big flavors.

Catch Method: Longline and trolling

Sustainability: Pacific Bonito are a highly migratory species, and reproduce rapidly and frequently throughout their range. They are managed at the state, national, and international levels, but ours are typically caught on short trips near the California coast. Bycatch is minimal with the type of fishing gear our fishing partners use for this species.

- MBA Seafood Watch rating: Best Choice

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: N/A

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Rockfish / Genus Sebastes and Sebastolobus

There are more than seventy rockfish species native to the Pacific coast of the U.S. and we offer as many varities as we can find. Chilipepper Rockfish, Blackgill Rockfish, Boccaccio Rockfish, Splitnose Rockfish, Vermillion Rockfish, Gopher Rockfish are a few of our favorites. "Rock Cod" or...

There are more than seventy rockfish species native to the Pacific coast of the U.S. and we offer as many varities as we can find. Chilipepper Rockfish, Blackgill Rockfish, Boccaccio Rockfish, Splitnose Rockfish, Vermillion Rockfish, Gopher Rockfish are a few of our favorites. "Rock Cod" or "Pacific Snapper" are other local nicknames for rockfish species. The southern half of the California coast has the most rockfish diversity anywhere, with at least 56 different species known. 

Rockfish earned their name because they are bottom-dwelling species that prefer rocky areas. Fish species in this genus have some of the longest lifespans of any fish on earth, and some have been recorded to live up to 205 years. These long life-spans made it difficult for some species to absorb industrial fishing pressures that peaked in the 1980's and '90's, and many rockfish species became overfished. Today though, Pacific groundfish populations like rockfish have largely recovered due to strict management and responsible fishermen.

Culinary Tips: All rockfish species have a mild flavor, cook to a medium firmness, and flake nicely. Larger fillets can be dredged in flour and pan fried, while smaller rockfish are delicous cooked whole. Rockfish is also sometimes served raw in a ceviche.

Catch Method: Bottom and midwater trawls, rod and reel, and traps

Sustainability: Rockfish fisheries are highly regulated under both state and federal laws. In federal waters, the rockfish trawl fishery is part of the Catch Shares program, with 100% observer coverage. Hook and line caught rockfish has very low bycatch rates. A growing number of Pacific rockfish fisheries on the west coast are becoming Marine Stewardship Council certified for sustainability.

- MBA Seafood Watch rating: Best Choice and Good Alternative

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: 2.5-4 out of 4

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Starry Flounder / Platichthys stellatus

Also known as California flounder, half the population of starry flounder is right-eyed and the other half is left-eyed. Much like chameleons and other species, they can change coloration to blend in with their surroundings, making them practically invisible to avoid predators. Yet they succumb...

Also known as California flounder, half the population of starry flounder is right-eyed and the other half is left-eyed. Much like chameleons and other species, they can change coloration to blend in with their surroundings, making them practically invisible to avoid predators. Yet they succumb to the appetites of marine mammals such as sea lions and seals. They feed primarily on zooplankton, small fish and crustaceans, amphipods, and copepods.

Culinary Tips: Starry flounder are best prepared in a recipe calling for dover sole or petrale sole. They delicate texture and mild flavor are ideal for broiling, pan frying, or gently sauteeing in a meuniere recipe.

Catch Method: Bottom Trawling

Sustainability: Starry flounder is another well-managed species in the West Coast Groundfish Fishery. Overfishing is not occuring in party because this species is not in high demand commercially. Gear modifications on bottom trawls minimize habitat disruption that is sometimes an issue with this gear type.

- MBA Seafood Watch rating: Best Choice

- NOAA Fish Stock Sustainability Index: 4 out of 4

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White Seabass / Atractoscion nobilis

The white seabass, also known as white weakfish or king croaker, is not a seabass at all. It is a member of the croaker family, and it is the largest croaker in the Pacific Ocean. This species can exceed 20 pounds (only in California), with the largest recorded specimen reaching over 5 feet long...

The white seabass, also known as white weakfish or king croaker, is not a seabass at all. It is a member of the croaker family, and it is the largest croaker in the Pacific Ocean. This species can exceed 20 pounds (only in California), with the largest recorded specimen reaching over 5 feet long and 93.1 pounds. They feed primarily on anchovies, sardines, and squid. Some adults have been found to have eaten nothing but Pacific mackerel, a strong tasting fish often used in sushi.

This is an infamous fish in the recreational spear-fishing community in southern California. They are a rare find and tend to prefer deeper, murkier waters. Spearing a white seabass is considered quite an accomplishment.

Culinary Tips: White seabass is a versatile fish that is great over the grill with simple seasoning. It can become a bit dry if overcooked though, so marinades are perfect for this species.

Catch Method: Trolling, rod and reel, or gillnet

Sustainability: The white sea bass population has recovered from heavier fishing pressure in the past. Today the population along the central coast of California and in Monterey Bay is believed to be healthy. When caught with hook and line, bycatch is very low.

- MBA Seafood Watch Rating: Good Alternative

- NOAA FishWatch Rating: Not rated

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