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Real Good Fish | Fish Species | | Fish Species | Bringing you the freshest sustainably caught LOCAL seafood!
“If we eat from our own shores, we're much more inclined to protect them, the water quality, and our marine environment.”
- Paul Greenberg, American Catch
Miyagi Oysters / Crassostrea gigas

Miyagi oysters (aka Japanese oysters or Pacific oysters) are the most widely farmed oysters in the world, since they are easy to grow and adapt to new environments easily. These marvelous mollusks can each clean up to 50 gallons of water a day! For this reason, oysters of any kind are one of the...

Miyagi oysters (aka Japanese oysters or Pacific oysters) are the most widely farmed oysters in the world, since they are easy to grow and adapt to new environments easily. These marvelous mollusks can each clean up to 50 gallons of water a day! For this reason, oysters of any kind are one of the most sustainable seafood choices on the market.

Our local oysters usually come from Tomales Bay and Morro Bay. They are available year-round, but the flavors are at their peak in the colder months. 

Culinary Tips: Raw Miyagi oysters have a briny flavor with a sweet, cucumber finish and are perfect with your favorite raw bar condiments. They're also fantastic grilled or broiled in the shell with a compound butter.

Catch Method: N/A

Sustainability: Oysters are as sustainable as sustainable gets. They filter and clean our waterways, they provide important habitat for juvenile fish, and they buffer our coastline from storm surge and waves. 

>MBA Seafood Watch: Best Choice

>NOAA Fishwatch Rating: Not Rated

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Red Abalone / Haliotis rufescens

While abalone have shells they are not technically shellfish. They are actually mollusks, more closely related to scallops, sea slugs, octopuses and squid. In some countries they are called sea snails.

Abalone start their lives as small larvae, when the females and the males release the eggs and...

While abalone have shells they are not technically shellfish. They are actually mollusks, more closely related to scallops, sea slugs, octopuses and squid. In some countries they are called sea snails.

Abalone start their lives as small larvae, when the females and the males release the eggs and sperm into the current. A 1.5 inch abalone may spawn 10,000 eggs or more at a time, while an 8 inch abalone may spawn 11 million or more. Yet the likelihood that an individual larva will make it to adulthood is very low, with a mortality rate that probably exceeds 99%.

Besides their delicious flavor, abalone are known for the beautiful colors of the inside of their shells. Large algae, such as the giant kelp found in Monterey Bay, are the preferred food of abalone, and this is why they grow so well in our local waters. Red abalone are the largest members of their genus; some have been known to reach up to 12.3 inches in length. They have many wild predators, with one in particular adept at removing all the abalone within reach: the southern sea otter. Unfortunately, the last 20 years have witnessed a significant decline in wild abalone populations due to high mortality rates, overharvesting by humans, illegal harvesting, competition for resources with other species, and loss of habitat. 

Lifespan: 34-54 years Size: 80-90 mm and ¾ lbs

Distribution: Found in the low intertidal to around 80 ft deep

How fished: Farmed

Why sustainable: In the Pacific, abalone farming is highly regulated while wild populations recover. Abalone are fed local algae (kelp), which regenerates quickly.

MBA Seafood Watch rating: Best Choice

NOAA FishWatch rating: Not rated.

Nutrition (per 100g): Calories 121, Total Fat 4.01g, Cholesterol 39mg, Selenium 48.1mcg, Sodium 90mg, Protein 19.8g.

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